Gettin' festy - Page 2

Summer in the Bay means music festival season — hold on to your butts (and your wallets)

|
(0)
JJAAXXNN at Hickey Fest.
PHOTO BY GINGER FIERSTIEN


FIELD OF DREAMS

In the summer of 1969, when Woodstock was changing the meaning of "music festival" on the East Coast via Jimi solos and free, mud-covered love, plans were taking shape for a San Francisco festival that, had it actually taken place, would have been legendary: The Wild West Festival, scheduled for Aug. 22-24, was designed as a three-day party, with regular (ticketed) concerts each night in Kezar Stadium, while other bands performed free music all day, each day, in Golden Gate Park.

Bill Graham and other SF rock scene movers and shakers worked collaboratively on organizing the festival, which — had it happened — would have seen Janis Joplin, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Sly and the Family Stone, Santana, Country Joe and the Fish, the Steve Miller Band, and half a dozen other iconic bands of the decade all taking the stage within 72 hours.

Why'd it fall apart? According to most versions of the story, too many of those involved wanted the whole damn thing to be free. Graham, among others, countered that, while the free music utopia was a nice idea, lights, a sound system, and other basic accoutrements of a music festival did in fact cost American dollars. The plans collapsed amid in-fighting, and the infamous Altamont free music festival was planned as a sort of make-up for December of that year — an organizational disaster of an event that came to be known for the death of Meredith Hunter, among other violence, signaling the end of a certain starry-eyed era.

So yeah, money has always been a sticky part of live music festivals. But the industry has boomed in a particularly mind-boggling way over the last decade; never before have ticket prices served as such a clear barrier to entry for your average, middle-class music fan. Forget Hipnic: In the days after Outside Lands sold out, enterprising San Franciscans began plonking their three-day festival passes onto the "for sale" section of Craigslist at upwards of $1,000 each.

The alternative? The "screw that corporate shit, let's do our own thing" attitude, which is, of course, exactly the kind of attitude that's birthed the bumper crop of smaller summer festivals that have sprung up in the Bay Area over the past few years, like Phono del Sol (July 12, an indie-leaning daylong affair in SF's Potrero del Sol Park, started by hip-kid music blog The Bay Bridged in 2010, tickets: $25-$30) and Burger Boogaloo (a cheekily irreverent punk, surf, and rockabilly fest over July 4 weekend in Oakland's Mosswood Park — weekend pass: $50). Both pair bigger, buzzy acts with national reach like Wye Oak (Phono del Sol) or Thee Oh Sees and the great Ronnie Spector (Burger Boogaloo) with a slew of local openers.

"I've played a few festivals, and when it's a really big thing, you realize there are just so many other huge bands that people would rather see," says Mikey Maramag, better known as the folk-tronica brains behind SF's Blackbird Blackbird. He'll be sharing a bill with Thao and the Get Down Stay Down, Nick Waterhouse, White Fence, A Million Billion Dying Suns, and others at Phono del Sol — which, judging by last year's attendance, could draw some 5,000 to 6,000 people.

Comments

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

Related articles

  • East Bay Beats

    A new Oakland music festival aims to bring art downtown. Plus: If you still believe in college radio, KUSF still needs you

  • Swimming solo

    Birds & Batteries' frontman steps dreamily out on his own. Plus: BottleRock 2.0, and The Chapel says "everyone chill"

  • California, from scratch

    A new band from Bay Area punk veterans — with members of Green Day and Jawbreaker — wants to earn your fandom on its own terms

  • Also from this author

  • Go do this thing tomorrow: Speak up for Viracocha

  • Bimbo's 365 club

    Guardian Small Business Award winner has been rocking the city for 85 years

  • Gimme 5: Must-see shows this week