In SF and Oakland, activists block tech buses to protest displacement

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Activists gathered at 24th and Valencia streets in San Francisco this morning to block a private Apple shuttle.
GUARDIAN PHOTO BY REBECCA BOWE

Between 70 and 100 protesters gathered at 24th and Valencia streets this morning (Fri/20) for yet another blockade of a private tech shuttle, this time to protest evictions in the city of San Francisco.

The activists, who were from Eviction Free San Francisco, Our Mission No Eviction, Causa Justa / Just Cause and others, stood in front of a white shuttle bus holding banners and signs. Some peeked through cardboard signs fashioned in the shape of place markers on Google maps, with “Evicted” written across the front.

The shuttle was bound for “Main Campus Ridgeview,” a hint that it was operated by Apple. While there was no contact between the bus passengers and the protesters, a few sitting inside the bus could be seen capturing the scene outside with their iPhones.

With chants of, “What do we want? No Eviction!” And, “Get off the bus! Join us!” The group of tenant advocates marched from the 24th Street BART station to the intersection, where Erin McElroy, who was an unwitting participant in union organizer Max Alper’s street theater performance during the Dec. 9 Google bus blockade, led the street rally on a megaphone.

“What we are against is eviction,” she said. “What we are against is the Ellis Act. We want the ruling class – which is becoming the tech class – to listen to our voices.”

Guardian video from today's protest by Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez.

Patricia Kerman, who is facing an Ellis Act eviction from her apartment of 27 years at 20th and Folsom streets in the Mission, was among the speakers who shared personal stories during the blockade, which lasted around twenty minutes or so. She told the Bay Guardian that she is a senior on disability, with a “very low fixed income,” and has had no luck finding alternative housing since she received an eviction notice. “He doesn’t understand that a roof over my head is more important than money in my pocket,” she said, referring to her landlord.

Paula Tejada, who is also facing eviction, said having rent control made it possible for her to get into a financial position to open her small business, Chile Lindo, a Mission District empanada shop near 16th and Capp streets. “I am once again proud of the Mission that stands for what is right,” she said of that morning’s action. “Not everyone is taking this lying down.” She added, “if you want homogeneous, go live in the suburbs.” 

Mariko Drew and Anabelle Bolanos had turned out with Our Mission No Eviction. Drew, who described herself as a longtime resident, said the bus was “a symbol of the privatization and increasing separation between the poor and the rich.” Bolanos chimed in, “It’s a constant reminder of how … our mayor and our local government has sold us out. [Mayor] Ed Lee is letting money make decisions.”

Highly visible activism around eviction and displacement has fueled new policy proposals, such as Mayor Ed Lee's recent announcement that affordable housing development would be prioritized.

Meanwhile, the Bay Guardian received reports that across the bay, two separate blockades of Google buses took place at Oakland BART stations.

According to a post on IndyBay, a Google bus was blocked at MacArthur BART station at 7:45am in Oakland. There have also been reports that activists blocked a tech shuttle in West Oakland.

When the Bay Guardian asked several protesters who were involved in the San Francisco action if there had been any coordination between the actions, they responded that there was not.

At the San Francisco protest, police showed up on the scene and asked people to step onto the sidewalk. The Apple bus departed and the protest concluded without incident.

 

This window was allegedly broken during the protest of this Google bus in Oakland.

 

Comments

I find progressives complaining about Rand quite interesting.

If there is any group who thinks more about themselves than Randroids, it's probably progressives. Two peas in a pod really.

Posted by Matlock on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 6:05 pm

Amen!

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 1:51 am

From Wikipedia:
(Positive form of Golden Rule): One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself.
(Negative form of Golden Rule): One should not treat others in ways that one would not like to be treated (also known as the Silver Rule).

Don't throw bricks through your neighbors' windows whether its their homes, cars, buses they take to work whether its public or private.

Think about the people that you're actually affecting - it could be your neighbor with a kind face that you actually get along with quite well. Maybe you never thought of where they work when you run into each other at the coffee shop or walking the dog. Its too bad that just because these people get on a tech company bus they're being dehumanized and seen as part of the borg. They're still individual peoples.

Another thing to think about is that these individuals and the companies they work for actually do a lot of humanitarian and charity work. They are trying to solve real local problems. That's how the shuttles came about in the first place.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 1:40 pm

"That's how the shuttles came about in the first place."

Yes and no. They probably added the shuttles because they felt it was the greener option and because they had employees asking for it. This doesn't actually solve local problems, it solves their local employee problems and helps mitigate traffic issues while saving gas, etc. I can see that. But the buses are also privatized. They come from a big corporate company making tons of money. Practically speaking *that's* how the shuttles "came about in the first place."

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 1:55 am

So now the rent control addicts have started to resort to terrorism....

Posted by Guest on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 3:14 pm

I'm sorry to see how few people on the comment chain seem to be able to empathize with the protesters. First of all, protests serve two main purposes, to make a statement about a point of view and to draw attention to an issue. They are not really about solving problems or changing the world in themselves, they are just a step toward change.

The protesters are reacting to real issues that are truly affecting many peoples' lives. The influx of money in areas like the mission in sf has driven rent prices up to rates that are unimaginable. San Francisco, is historically a multicultural place that has huge importance as home of sub-culture and immigrant movements of the last century from hippies to lgbt community. In the past has provided a safe haven for people who are outside of the mainstream. In turn, these people have built it's culture and sense of place so that is unlike anywhere else in the world.

It is an unfortunate truth that the people who are now in control of the city due to extremely disproportionate financial power do not do more to foster the culture that made this city what it is, by helping it remain a cultural hub and sanctuary for those who are outside of the box. On the contrary, though they are paying the exorbitant rent that makes it so that others who have more traditional urban jobs can no longer live in san fran, they aren't supporting the existing cultural or even municipal infrastructure. They often express inflammatory opinions about their lack of respect for the less fortunate. The result is something similar to a to a colonization of the city. As they shell out money that others don't have at new businesses with high prices that cater to them, they are driving existing ones out, they ride in their own private buses that significantly increase traffic on busy streets like valencia st. inconveniencing everyone around them rather than working to improve public transit which might help others, etc.

As one person quoted in the article referenced when she said, "If you want homogeneity, live in the suburbs," it is indeed unclear what their motivation for living in these neighborhoods is in the first place when they don't really seem to fit in there or even seem particularly interested in what the area has to offer. (for example, the mission was a largely queer and latin american community by self-selection, before the people who ride google buses moved in). Although that in itself is a little beside the point, it does add salt to the wound for those of us who moved here intentionally because it is a rare place where we can connect to a specific, unique community that doesn't exist in other parts of the world, especially as we are rewarded by having to watch that sense of community disappear.

-J.S.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 3:45 pm

by a few resident trolls who are addicted to these pages. They don't represent SFBG readers, and they don't represent the people of San Francisco.

I empathize with the protesters, and I understand why they're protesting the Google bus. The tech boom is driving evictions and displacing residents. The bubble will burst, but it will leave a trail of havoc in its wake.

I think a lot of people implicitly understand this, even the trolls. Their rhetoric is an attempt to cool the backlash from ordinary San Franciscans, but nobody's buying it.

Posted by Greg on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 7:43 pm

"The bubble will burst, but it will leave a trail of havoc in its wake."

Yes...I'm surprised that Google has lasted as long as it already has

After all, what does it provide? The ability to see information about any conceivable subject just by entering a few key strokes? Seems like a real silly fad to me.

Posted by C.C.P. on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 10:38 pm

Google's a big company, therefore there is no tech bubble. How foolish of me to think that bubbles burst because of quaint notions like... history. Who cares about history when we're in a totally new economy? Keep loading up on that Twitter and Zynga stock. You'll be a millionaire. The good times will never end!

Posted by Greg on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 10:57 pm

Clearly that is nonsense. We have had growth for decades. The fact that it is cyclical doesn't means that it is not increasing overall.

Of course, you'd love a market collapse because you love misery, poverty and failure.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 11:23 am

I'm sorry to see how few people on the comment chain seem to be able to empathize with the protesters. First of all, protests serve two main purposes, to make a statement about a point of view and to draw attention to an issue. They are not really about solving problems or changing the world in themselves, they are just a step toward change.

The protesters are reacting to real issues that are truly affecting many peoples' lives. The influx of money in areas like the mission in sf has driven rent prices up to rates that are unimaginable. San Francisco, is historically a multicultural place that has huge importance as home of sub-culture and immigrant movements of the last century from hippies to lgbt community. In the past has provided a safe haven for people who are outside of the mainstream. In turn, these people have built it's culture and sense of place so that is unlike anywhere else in the world.

It is an unfortunate truth that the people who are now in control of the city due to extremely disproportionate financial power do not do more to foster the culture that made this city what it is, by helping it remain a cultural hub and sanctuary for those who are outside of the box. On the contrary, though they are paying the exorbitant rent that makes it so that others who have more traditional urban jobs can no longer live in san fran, they aren't supporting the existing cultural or even municipal infrastructure. They often express inflammatory opinions about their lack of respect for the less fortunate. The result is something similar to a to a colonization of the city. As they shell out money that others don't have at new businesses with high prices that cater to them, they are driving existing ones out, they ride in their own private buses that significantly increase traffic on busy streets like valencia st. inconveniencing everyone around them rather than working to improve public transit which might help others, etc.

As one person quoted in the article referenced when she said, "If you want homogeneity, live in the suburbs," it is indeed unclear what their motivation for living in these neighborhoods is in the first place when they don't really seem to fit in there or even seem particularly interested in what the area has to offer. (for example, the mission was a largely queer and latin american community by self-selection, before the people who ride google buses moved in). Although that in itself is a little beside the point, it does add salt to the wound for those of us who moved here intentionally because it is a rare place where we can connect to a specific, unique community that doesn't exist in other parts of the world, especially as we are rewarded by having to watch that sense of community disappear.

-J.S.

Posted by J.S. on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 3:46 pm

I'm sorry to see how few people on the comment chain seem to be able to empathize with the protesters. First of all, protests serve two main purposes, to make a statement about a point of view and to draw attention to an issue. They are not really about solving problems or changing the world in themselves, they are just a step toward change.

The protesters are reacting to real issues that are truly affecting many peoples' lives. The influx of money in areas like the mission in sf has driven rent prices up to rates that are unimaginable. San Francisco, is historically a multicultural place that has huge importance as home of sub-culture and immigrant movements of the last century from hippies to lgbt community. In the past has provided a safe haven for people who are outside of the mainstream. In turn, these people have built it's culture and sense of place so that is unlike anywhere else in the world.

It is an unfortunate truth that the people who are now in control of the city due to extremely disproportionate financial power do not do more to foster the culture that made this city what it is, by helping it remain a cultural hub and sanctuary for those who are outside of the box. On the contrary, though they are paying the exorbitant rent that makes it so that others who have more traditional urban jobs can no longer live in san fran, they aren't supporting the existing cultural or even municipal infrastructure. They often express inflammatory opinions about their lack of respect for the less fortunate. The result is something similar to a to a colonization of the city. As they shell out money that others don't have at new businesses with high prices that cater to them, they are driving existing ones out, they ride in their own private buses that significantly increase traffic on busy streets like valencia st. inconveniencing everyone around them rather than working to improve public transit which might help others, etc.

As one person quoted in the article referenced when she said, "If you want homogeneity, live in the suburbs," it is indeed unclear what their motivation for living in these neighborhoods is in the first place when they don't really seem to fit in there or even seem particularly interested in what the area has to offer. (for example, the mission was a largely queer and latin american community by self-selection, before the people who ride google buses moved in). Although that in itself is a little beside the point, it does add salt to the wound for those of us who moved here intentionally because it is a rare place where we can connect to a specific, unique community that doesn't exist in other parts of the world, especially as we are rewarded by having to watch that sense of community disappear.

-J.S.

Posted by J.S. on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 3:47 pm

I'm sorry to see how few people on the comment chain seem to be able to empathize with the protesters. First of all, protests serve two main purposes, to make a statement about a point of view and to draw attention to an issue. They are not really about solving problems or changing the world in themselves, they are just a step toward change.

The protesters are reacting to real issues that are truly affecting many peoples' lives. The influx of money in areas like the mission in sf has driven rent prices up to rates that are unimaginable. San Francisco, is historically a multicultural place that has huge importance as home of sub-culture and immigrant movements of the last century from hippies to lgbt community. In the past has provided a safe haven for people who are outside of the mainstream. In turn, these people have built it's culture and sense of place so that is unlike anywhere else in the world.

It is an unfortunate truth that the people who are now in control of the city due to extremely disproportionate financial power do not do more to foster the culture that made this city what it is, by helping it remain a cultural hub and sanctuary for those who are outside of the box. On the contrary, though they are paying the exorbitant rent that makes it so that others who have more traditional urban jobs can no longer live in san fran, they aren't supporting the existing cultural or even municipal infrastructure. They often express inflammatory opinions about their lack of respect for the less fortunate. The result is something similar to a to a colonization of the city. As they shell out money that others don't have at new businesses with high prices that cater to them, they are driving existing ones out, they ride in their own private buses that significantly increase traffic on busy streets like valencia st. inconveniencing everyone around them rather than working to improve public transit which might help others, etc.

As one person quoted in the article referenced when she said, "If you want homogeneity, live in the suburbs," it is indeed unclear what their motivation for living in these neighborhoods is in the first place when they don't really seem to fit in there or even seem particularly interested in what the area has to offer. (for example, the mission was a largely queer and latin american community by self-selection, before the people who ride google buses moved in). Although that in itself is a little beside the point, it does add salt to the wound for those of us who moved here intentionally because it is a rare place where we can connect to a specific, unique community that doesn't exist in other parts of the world, especially as we are rewarded by having to watch that sense of community disappear.

-J.S.

Posted by J.S. on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 3:48 pm

I'm sorry to see how few people on the comment chain seem to be able to empathize with the protesters. First of all, protests serve two main purposes, to make a statement about a point of view and to draw attention to an issue. They are not really about solving problems or changing the world in themselves, they are just a step toward change.

The protesters are reacting to real issues that are truly affecting many peoples' lives. The influx of money in areas like the mission in sf has driven rent prices up to rates that are unimaginable. San Francisco, is historically a multicultural place that has huge importance as home of sub-culture and immigrant movements of the last century from hippies to lgbt community. In the past has provided a safe haven for people who are outside of the mainstream. In turn, these people have built it's culture and sense of place so that is unlike anywhere else in the world.

It is an unfortunate truth that the people who are now in control of the city due to extremely disproportionate financial power do not do more to foster the culture that made this city what it is, by helping it remain a cultural hub and sanctuary for those who are outside of the box. On the contrary, though they are paying the exorbitant rent that makes it so that others who have more traditional urban jobs can no longer live in san fran, they aren't supporting the existing cultural or even municipal infrastructure. They often express inflammatory opinions about their lack of respect for the less fortunate. The result is something similar to a to a colonization of the city. As they shell out money that others don't have at new businesses with high prices that cater to them, they are driving existing ones out, they ride in their own private buses that significantly increase traffic on busy streets like valencia st. inconveniencing everyone around them rather than working to improve public transit which might help others, etc.

As one person quoted in the article referenced when she said, "If you want homogeneity, live in the suburbs," it is indeed unclear what their motivation for living in these neighborhoods is in the first place when they don't really seem to fit in there or even seem particularly interested in what the area has to offer. (for example, the mission was a largely queer and latin american community by self-selection, before the people who ride google buses moved in). Although that in itself is a little beside the point, it does add salt to the wound for those of us who moved here intentionally because it is a rare place where we can connect to a specific, unique community that doesn't exist in other parts of the world, especially as we are rewarded by having to watch that sense of community disappear.

-J.S.

Posted by J.S. on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 3:49 pm

doesn't make you any less wrong.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 4:55 pm

I have lots of gay "techie" friends paying those rents. Are they not contributing to the diversity?

Does their "techie" override their "gay"?

Posted by Bostondude on Jan. 07, 2014 @ 5:14 pm

I am Queer and have been in the Mission for 32 years, I don't expect time and inflation to stand still for me ! EVERY THING CHANGES. Only lunatics don't know that.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 4:11 pm

Rents and housing prices have gone up much faster than inflation. Only lunatics would oppose reasonable regulation.

Posted by Greg on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 8:09 am

Rent control as-is is not reasonable which is exactly why the Ellis Act was passed - to recreate balance.

You like balance, right?

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 11:21 am

Now SF is providing a safe haven for Tech... Oh wait, they are ranting against them just like the Straight people did against the queers 40 years ago..Funny how the oppressed, so easily become the oppressors.....

Posted by Guest on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 5:08 pm

It is really an amazing thing to watch was once really a revolutionary movement turn 100% reactionary and oppose all change of any kind. It only took about one generation, too.

Just an astonishing thing to see unfold before my very eyes. I guess it really is true that once a group has power, they lose empathy for anyone else.

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 7:59 pm

Somebody forgot to tell Ed Lee, and his army of trolls.

Of course if this tech-fueled affordability crisis keeps going, progressives very well might be back in power soon. Ed's approval rating is now barely over 50%, and falling.

Posted by Greg on Dec. 20, 2013 @ 8:10 pm

But you are so left-wing, you cannot see that

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 7:51 am

Should just run them over...technically they are jay-walking, so it would be their fault not the drivers'.

This is just another case of those that refuse to do what is necessary griping about those that do. People just looking for handouts...

Since the government at large started subsidizing housing and living expenses (welfare/food stamps) this country has been going down the toilet at an alarming rate. What needs to happen is to stop both of those programs and reinvest that money into basic infrastructure...aging power lines, bad roads, etc. All of that will create the need for an unskilled labor force that these "protesters" would be perfect for.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 6:50 am

I'd seriously consider violence against anyone who tried to stop me getting to work. Or for that matter tried in any way to detain me against my will.

I'd like to see these losers slapped down, but giving them a martyr might be a strategic error.

Fines and jail time is better.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 7:50 am

Foreign purchasers, property speculators, investment property owners, and landlords trying to cash in on recent IPOs have driven up rental prices in SF. I've been beaten out on bids for property several times when Chinese nationals have come in with a 126% all cash offer while preparing for closing and vulched the property out from under me.

You should also be aware that if you invest $500,000 or more in a residential property, S.1746/2011 means that you basically get a free immigration visa, if you are willing to live in the property for a period of at least six months, and meet a few other (easy to meet) criteria.

Hitting the "at least $500,000" mark in SF is pretty easy, since the median house price is $849,475; it's a lot harder in places like Ottumwa Iowa, with an median house price is $94,500.

Basically foreign buyers have reinflated the purchasing bubble, and the house flippers have jumped in with both feet thinking the bubble is over, on top of the landlords not understanding employee stock lockup periods and thinking these guys now have ready cash (I have a lot of Twitter employee friends who've had to move because they can't touch the money the landlords think they have for another six months; same thing happened to rents around the Facebook IPO, with a lot of those guys moving too).

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 8:01 am

Move away from one of the most expensive cities in the nation if you can't pay your rent.

What is it about Californians that they can't just man up and move inland ( even in their own state! ) and watch their rent drop by half.

They are protesting their suffering but don't bother looking around at their own SELF CREATED suffering.

Anyone who wants to move the the midwest, call me and I'll buy the a bus ticket

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 8:18 am

"self-created suffering"... as if they're raising their own rents or something.

Posted by Greg on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 8:27 am

"self-created suffering"... as if they're raising their own rents or something.

No, they are not raising their own rents. The landlords/property owners are the ones raising the rents. And the reason its being raised is for pure greed. Not by the companies the people are working for, but by the owners of the homes/apartments. The owners see an influx of people moving into an area due to low rents, and raise the prices trying to grab as much money as possible. Evicting as many people paying lower rents as possible to make way for the "new" people so they can charge more.

I have seen this happen Everywhere. From Northwest Territories in Canada, all the way down to Panama. Its the property owners greed pure and simple. Just some areas is more prevalent then others. Personally when I lived in LA, I had to move to Orange County due to the fact landlord didn't renew any of the leases for the entire building I was living at. He emptied the WHOLE building, offering new pricing. Went from $732 or so to over $900. So I packed up moved to Orange County, found a place there for $550 a month, bigger place too, but had to commute into LA to work. Then many other people starting moving to Orange County and as far as Corona in droves to escape high rents (Early 2000's). Again I ended up having to move, this time landed in Moreno Valley. Now my commute was 2 hours each way.

Did I ever once blame the other people (or the companies they worked for) moving into the areas I was in? NO. I blamed the owners of the properties and the local housing and rental boards for allowing the gouging.

This so called "protest" is nothing short of a childish and brainless act. If you want attention, figure out the real cause of your problem. Don't interfere with innocent random peoples lives just for publicity. Those workers on the bus, and the bus itself nor the companies they work for have nothing do do with your problem. Last I knew we are a free people. Can you really blame them for looking for cheap housing? We have the freedom to live anywhere we damn well please, so who are you to condemning them for such a basic right/freedom?

Also personally I would love to have worked for a company that valued its employees enough to set up transportation!

In the end, this group needs to stop and think before they act. They seem to be content on eviction and rent price issues, so go after the people who control that. Contact your local government offices, create a petition, get people to sign it. Change the laws. Fight the greed, don't just keep messing with people that have nothing to do with the problem. They are just trying to work and make a living.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 9:33 am

Stockholm Syndrome to accompany your weird combination of ineffectual advocacy and commenting on San Francisco from Moreno Valley.

Bizarre.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 10:01 am

Do know what an example is? Was illustrating that the issue San Francisco is facing isn't exclusive that area. Its everywhere. Furthermore, was directing the to point that actions should be focused to the source of a problem.

For example: I don't like price of apples, or the apples are not same quality as before. So I go and protest a potato farm, blocking the workers from entering.

...Doesn't make sense does it?

Posted by Paul on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 10:23 am

leading business cities around the world.

If you want a cheap home, you go somewhere else. You can buy a house in Detroit for a dollar. Why aren't these whiners doing that?

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 11:08 am

Landlords are not in it for charity. Its a business pure and simple. If they can easily get a certain rent then that is the correct price for that unit. If they stay unrented for a while then its too high.

My parents own 2 4 unit apartment buildings. One is small. its just a one bed room with a office room besides the main kitchen living area. Key is to raise the rents to just that magic point where you get a 4-7 calls. If you get 10+ people calling to look at it then the rent is too low.

Profit is the entire point. We don't care about anything else.

Posted by Guest on Apr. 15, 2014 @ 8:01 am

Why should housing costs somehow magically be immune from that?

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 9:45 am

Inflation is caused by too much money chasing too few goods. Speculative asset bubbles are caused by too much credit chasing too few goods.

Posted by marcos on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 10:18 am

market cycles. If everything else is going up in price, then so does the cost of housing.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 11:07 am

Hey SF pansies come over here to NY where everything is expensive and gentrification is a fluid process that transforms every nook and cranny. I make 150k a year working in IT, and guess what - i aint shit -- i take the train like everybody else. I cant imagine metlife paying someone to shuttle my ass to work lol they would tell me to f' myself. I feel bad for the residents of the mission district as they surely see what is coming (the suburbs). They have a right to be angry, i only wish the anger would amount to something and benefit their situation.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 1:58 pm

I should know - I used to take one very day when I was there.

And limo's for the management, of course.

Guess you just work for the wrong company.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 21, 2013 @ 2:21 pm

Perhaps I'm a bit dense, but what is blocking the buses supposed to do? I know the fact that Google has moved in has caused the rents to raise, but they don't decide the rents, the landlord does. The issue is not about the bus service, but about the exorbitant rent prices, is it not? So how does blocking a bus help underline the fact that the rent is ridiculous and people are being evicted because the landlord wants to replace them with a higher-paying tenants?
You need to be able to connect an issue to your protest for people to get a clear message of what your issue is. Blocking a google bus does not make me think of rent issues. It makes me think you have a problem with the shuttle service or Google or both. You also need to rally around a reasonable proposed solution. Telling Google to go away is not a reasonable solution. They have a right to be where they please, just like the tenants do. Making a higher pay check does not exclude them from that right. Now, perhaps if they were asking Google to specifically help out with a lobby for rent control that could be a reasonable solution.
Essentially, I'm saying that they 1) need to better communicate their issue, and 2) need to come up with a proposed solution that is within in the realm of possibility.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 22, 2013 @ 9:43 pm

Those people complaining should move somewhere else. If you don't have the money to live there, you move. And that's it. Why should I care ? I work, earn money and buy or rent what pleases me, as you do.

So you want to be able to pay 1/100th of what I'm going to pay for a rent, in the same area ? Sure. Keep dreaming.

All those SF morons : get the hell out. Prices are going up because people with more money are coming in. You will move to other, more poor areas, with PEOPLE LIKE YOU.

If you don't like it, go live in some communist country like North Korea.

Posted by Maurane Schweitzer on Dec. 23, 2013 @ 12:10 pm

I disagree with these protesters. If you can't afford the rent in a downtown location, then move out to the suburbs. Nobody is entitled to a downtown apartment. Even in Utah, downtown apartments cost more to rent because they're conveniently located at the center of everything. The rest of us who live in the suburbs have to drive downtown and fight with each other for parking.

These protesters sound very self-entitled.

Posted by Guest on Dec. 27, 2013 @ 2:09 pm

(sung to the tune of "Here's to the State of Mississippi")

Here's to the state of San Francisco
Where people wait for buses, that never seem to come
And bigger better buses, they always seem to run
On time to corporate campus, where they're all having fun
At treadmill desks and naprooms, but they never see the sun
Here's to the town, you're tearing asunder
Google go and find yourself another city you can plunder

Here's to the state of San Francisco
Where tax breaks go to builders, and companies that tweet
They say that they're improving, our lives on Market Street
Then complain about the people, still barely on their feet
Who've been living on their corner, long before Technology
Here's to the town, you're tearing asunder
Twitter go and find yourself another city you can plunder

Here's to the state of San Francisco
Where I once had an apartment I could actually afford
But the techies down in Mountain View, I guess they just got bored
And then builders called the mayor with a plan that really scored
In the backrooms of my City Hall, where future profits soared
Here's to the town, you're tearing asunder
Carmel Partners find yourself another city you can plunder

Here's to the state of San Francisco
Apple, Yahoo, and Genentech, and Facebook and the rest
Are leaving us the problems, while taking all the best
This city has to offer, as they pry and prod and test
How much can they squeeze out of us, the jewel of the west
Here's to the town, you're tearing asunder
Hi Tech go and find yourself another city you can plunder

Here's to the state of San Francisco
Where politicians tell us, it's all about the jobs
But the only ones still unemployed are San Francisco slobs
As they move into our city, our apartments they do rob
If you haven't guessed by now, Larry Ellison's just a knob
Here's to the town, you're tearing asunder
Ed Lee go and find yourself another city you can plunder

Posted by gussdolan on Dec. 30, 2013 @ 2:34 am

I think this is absolutely disgusting. It's now the tech workers fault that San Francisco has extremely limited housing and that the competitive market drives up prices?

Do you know how much these people pay in taxes and how many services the city can provide because of those taxes? You want all the tech companies to leave the Bay area and live in a city like Detroit?

Stop being a bunch of idiots!

Posted by Bostondude on Jan. 07, 2014 @ 5:02 pm

housing shortage and everything else. A couple of years ago, it was bankers, and that didn't work out for them.

Now it is tech workers.

Next year? Who knows?

Posted by Guest on Jan. 07, 2014 @ 5:12 pm

Actually those bankers almost caused the implosion of several economies because they like to play fast and loose with money that isn't theirs (surprise, surprise), so they can take a slice off the top, and fuck everybody else... Degenerate scumbags with that thinnest veneer of civility (otherwise known as money) that deserve to be thrown in where they belong with murderers, rapists and others of their ilk (i.e. psycho, sociopaths and others that don't possess a conscience). Not unlike some of the rightard commenters on here, who I'm sure had absolutely NO assistance, material or otherwise (yes nepotism, I'm looking at you. You too old boys club!) to 'achieve' what they so righteously feel is their due. Entitled unadventurous twats always move in and mess with places that are populated by interesting, adventurous folk, and inevitably turn it into some toolbag cookie-cutter douche-fest. Yes, perfectly acceptable to go and rape a community for the sake of profit... Some of you people (sorry, MASSIVE ELITIST KNOBS) really need to take a look at yourselves.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 27, 2014 @ 2:28 am

By providing private buses for its employees, Silicon Valley industries are shifting the impact of the jobs-housing imbalance of their making to San Francisco............

A short history lesson of SF housing is in order...First their were Indians, they were missionized by white Spaniards, califorinios lived there then they were displaced , then Russians, sailors and other euro opportunists, usually Anglos. the chinese, Nordics and Italians, carved out enclaves...Each (unless they were cracking virgin soil) was at the expense of those that resided there before. The Irish and Jews pushed in, all went fairly well and the groups were meshing without major problems , but the moralities started changing when it became more liberal judeo-catholisized and went away from waspy. The blue discharge homosexuals were the first major changers, They targeted not the Chinese or Italian neighborhoods where they knew they'd have a fight they could not win...they targeted the Anglo Nordic areas for DISPLACEMENT. The first major displacements in SF happened after WW2, and this brain trust was displaced to guess where? Silicon valley and the peninsula into all that nice new tract housing....So now it's all full up in SV, and young folks without families don't need the safety of the suburbs...So guess who gets to get DISPLACED from SF now? That's right, the same suspects that made SF unlivable for those anglos in the first place...It's poetic justice really, their little party is over and now the shoe is now on the other foot.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 19, 2014 @ 11:12 am

commute out. In fact, the sole purpose of BART is to funnel suburban commuters into the city to work and then send them home again at night.

So it's exact opposite of what you claim. SF has too little housing for the number of jobs here, while the suburbs have too much housing for the jobs there.

A few buses going south in the morning do not change the overall dynamic.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 19, 2014 @ 11:53 am

after all the poor whites finished taking out all the poor blacks and Latinos out of Oakland and San Francisco now it's their turn if their time move over white people there's a new GAME INTown I just called capitalism called capitalism... Karma is a bitch..uh lol

Posted by white rage on Mar. 03, 2014 @ 3:25 pm

All I hear is people crying that they don't want to move. cry me a river. My parents own two 4 unit apartment buildings. We raise the rent to what we know we can get. We don't care if other people can't afford it. Or if they lived there for years. Rent control is stupid. Let the free market control it. You can't afford it then move some place you can.

Posted by Guest on Apr. 15, 2014 @ 7:56 am

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